NAVA Communications Coordinator

We are currently looking for an experienced communicator to coordinate our Membership, advocacy and public-facing work so that we can achieve real and lasting change.

The National Association of Visual Arts (NAVA) leads policy, advocacy and action for a visual arts sector that’s ambitious and fair.

Across everything we do, NAVA is committed to demonstrating the values that artists and the sector demand we uphold, including putting First Nations first; paying artists and arts workers as per the NAVA Code of Practice as a minimum; providing accessible services, resources and events; respecting human rights and dignities; standing against discrimination, harassment and bullying; collaborating and working closely with sector organisations who are committed to raising standards; promoting environmental sustainability through our services, purchases and partnerships and events; and championing bold, rigorous thinking that translates into ethical action.

We are currently looking for an experienced communicator to coordinate our Membership, advocacy and public-facing work so that we can achieve real and lasting change. This is a rare opportunity to be both hands-on and strategic, collaborating with a small team for big impact on artists’ rights, sector development and arts policy.

First Nations Australians, people from culturally diverse communities, and people with disability, are strongly encouraged to apply.

First Nations applicants are encouraged to contact Georgia Mokak, First Nations Engagement Coordinator via georgia@visualarts.net.au with questions about the role and/or the organisation. 

Follow the link below to access the position description and details on how to apply.

Deadline 12:00noon Monday 10 February 2020.

Image: Kamilaroi, Kooma, Jiman and Gurang Gurang artist Richard Bell addresses the press at NAVA's Future/Forward, 15 August 2018 at Parliament House ACT. Artwork in background Michael Ramsden and Graham Oldroyd, Coastal river, one of six River Odyssey panels, 1986-1988, Parliament House Collection. Photo Zan Wimberley.